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Posts Tagged ‘Vocabularies’

AMERICAN Vs. BRITISH ENGLISH

November 19, 2013 Leave a comment

Generally, here in Indonesia, English learners are learning British English at school and I did it too. Besides British English, there are also American English and Australian English, which are rich of slang and non-formal expressions. But, whatever the English type we use, it still “English” itself. The differences are only showing us a set of different cultures. In daily use such as in speaking, British English is usually quite formal while American and Australian English is less formal. American English is also simpler in its writing form. Let’s check the comparison.

AMERICAN VS. BRITISH SPELLING DIFFERENCES AND COMMON WORDS

Ense vs. Ence

American

British

Defense

Defence

License

Licence

Practise

Practice

Er vs. Re

American

British

Center

Centre

Liter

Litre

Meter

Metre

Theater

Theatre

Or vs. Our

American

British

Color

Colour

Favorite

Favourite

Neighbor

Neighbour

Ed vs. T

American

British

Dreamed

Dreamt

Learned

Learnt

Burned

Burnt

K vs. Que

American

British

Bank

Banque

Check

Cheque

Checker

Chequer

Ize vs. Ise

American

British

Analyze

Analyse

Criticize

Criticise

Recognize

Recognise

Ll vs. L

American

British

Enrollment

Enrolment

Fulfill

Fulfil

Skillful

Skilful

Og vs. Ogue

American

British

Analog

Analogue

Catalog

Catalogue

Dialog

Dialogue

Common Words

American

British

Jewelry

Jewellery

Pajamas

Pyjamas

Plow

Plough

Program

Programme

Mom

Mum

Mustache

Moustache

Specialty

Speciality

Tire

Tyre

Whiskey

Whisky

Vacation

Holiday

Gas

Petrol

Parking lot

Car park

Subway

Underground

Highway / freeway

Motorway

Candy

Sweets

Chips

Crisps

French fries

Chips

Cookie

Biscuit

Take out

Takeaway

Soccer

Football

Football

American football

Elementary school

Primary school

High school

Secondary school

Recess

Break

Schedule

Timetable

Grade

Mark

Cell phone

Mobile phone

Elevator

Lift

Flashlight

Torch

Downtown

City centre

Trunk

Boot

Hood

Bonnet

Math

Maths

Restroom

Toilet

Drug store

Chemist

Zipper

Zip

Closet

Wardrobe

Line

Queue

Diaper

Nappy

Apartment

Flat

Liquor store

Off-licence

Store

Shop

Sales clerk

Shop assistant

Yard

Garden

Garbage / trash can

Rubbish

Fall

Autumn

Bathtub

Bath

Bill

Bank note

Call collect

Reverse the charges

Check

Bill

First floor

Ground floor

Movie

Film

One-way ticket

Single ticket

Round-trip ticket

Return ticket

Pants / slacks

Trousers

Period

Full stop

Principal

Head teacher

Purse

Handbag

Sidewalk

Pavement

Zip code

Postcode

Don’t be confused. We can use both of them without hesitation. There will be no difference when we speak them aloud.

LEARNING SPOKEN ENGLISH IN THE HALF OF THE TIME

November 1, 2013 2 comments

The article below was summarized and was adjusted (especially for non-English speaking readers) from LEARNING SPOKEN ENGLISH book by Lynn Lundquist that can be downloaded / ordered from www.FreeEnglishNow.com. The PDF version of this book where I make this summarize from, was downloaded from www.filecrop.com. But please note that I give you no warranty if the that PDF version is the legal one since there was another mark showing that the PDF version was re-compiled.

FreeEnglishNow

FreeEnglishNow

Introduction: speak first, then grammar

We may often ask to the other people or even ask to ourselves, “why have we studied English in school so long time without learning to speak fluently?”

The answer of the question is because our teacher have tried to train our mind with written exercises without retraining our tongue at the same time. And this big problem is occurred almost everywhere, in the non-English speaking countries with non-English native speaker as the teacher. Written exercises and grammar-based instruction are everything, while in fact, this type of learning has hindered English learning by segregating individual areas of study. Grammar-based English training has not only isolated proprioceptive training areas so that it prevents simultaneous skill development, it has replaced it with visual memory training by using written assignments. The result for the student is that, gaining English fluency requires far more study time, pronunciation is often faulty, and grammar becomes more difficult to learn. Read more…

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH LEARNING EXPERIENCE WITH FIREFOX ADD-ONS

July 1, 2013 Leave a comment

spell-checker add-ons

Mozilla Firefox is well known as a popular browser with thousands of add-ons that will make our internet surfing experience become secure, easy, and fun. We can find any add-ons: download managers, e-book readers, offline page readers, pop-up blockers, web inspectors, password managers, even translation and language learning tools! Here I will tell you some of language-related add-ons for Firefox that I have tried. But, since there are so many interesting add-ons in Mozilla’s database, I simply want to show you some of them. Read more…

WONDERSHARE: NOW YOU CAN CREATE YOUR OWN DIGITAL TEST

January 20, 2012 Leave a comment

Do you have a lot of questions you usually give to your students as a homework or worksheet at school? Are you tired and bored of wasting papers and ink to print the questions for your students? If so, you may try a software called “Wondershare Quiz Creator”. This proprietary application is so powerful to organize and share your “questions bank”.

Wondershare QuizCreator is a software developed by Wondershare Software Co., Ltd that focused on making, organizing, and sharing any kind of test such as true-false questions, multiple choices, multiple responses, fill in the blank, matching, sequence, word bank, click map, and short essay. Besides that, you can make a survey too, with categories: like scale, yes/no question, pick one/pick many, short answer, matching, ranking, which word, and essay. The interface is almost the same as Microsoft Office Suite’s interface, so it will make you comfort as working in Microsoft office environment. It so powerful to build a flash-based application and make you keep focus on the material, not the design. It’s also easy to use: type the questions in the question column, and type the answer(s) or the choice(s) in the answer column. You are free to decide the given point for each right answer, too. The supported output formats are flash application (need flash player version 9 or higher), Ms. Word, Ms. Excel, and pack into CD. Besides that, you can share your works by uploading them to Wondershare website or your own website / blog.

Wondershare QuizCreator can simplify your work in building test application than using other authoring software that might force you to master a particular programming language or lines of codes. You can type as many as questions you want and it will instantly show the result of the test (the score) in the end of test. To try Wondershare QuizCreator, you can download a 15 days trial from www.wondershare.com/pro/quizcreator.html. After the trial period has expired, you may decide to buy it later. To download the example of the test, you can visit www.englishteststore.com.

PLAYING DOMINO CARD TO TEACH ENGLISH

October 4, 2010 Leave a comment

gameDo you know “Domino Card”? If you do, you can use it to teach your students, especially to train them in arranging good sentences based on grammar. How can? Truly, the card that will be used is not the real “Domino Card”. But we will make it by ourselves. Just prepare some pieces of papers, 5 x 2.5 cm. Then divide the paper into 2 parts separated by a line. On each part, put a word. The arrangement of the words can be as follow: 1. I – like, 2. Love – story, 3. Like – writing, 4. And – poem, 5. Writing – love, 6. Story – and, 7. etc. From those words, we can make a sentence: I like writing love story and poem.
To play this game, your students only have to arrange the words into sentence. Like playing “Domino Card”, the same words should be piled. And, this game, actually is a very good way to vary your teaching method. On the other hands, you can make and stimulate your students to practice about using grammar directly. Ask them to conclude the writing structure and the formula of their sentence. Don’t be confused, it just like a jumbled words game. But here, you have to put the scattered words on the cards. You can fill the cards with words that will construct preferences, past events, expression of possibilities, degree of comparison, etc. So, if in “scrabble game” your students have to arrange so many letters into words, here they have to arrange so many words into sentences. Let’s play!