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Posts Tagged ‘English Vocabularies’

THINGS YOUR ENGLISH BOOKS DON’T TELL YOU

March 23, 2015 Leave a comment

Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You

For about a month ago, I bought a very interesting book entitled “Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You” from Buku Kita. The book contains a lot of information that can be rarely found in the common English text books (and also in the classroom).

The contents of the book were actually a compilation of tweets by @englishtips4u. But, although the book was “developed” from tweets on Twitter, it doesn’t literally mean that the book only contains short sentences as on Twitter. So, would you like to read further about the book? Here we go: Read more…

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HOW TO USE “I.E.” AND “E.G.” CORRECTLY

October 9, 2014 Leave a comment

It sometimes hard (and also confusing) to decide whether to use i.e. or e.g. in writing, because they seems to be the same. But, through this article, I will reveal the “secret” about how to use i.e. and e.g. correctly and effectively. Most of the “original” sentences/theories can be found here: here and here.

What to know about i.e. and e.g.

  • e.is the abbreviation of the Latin phrase “id est” meaning “that is” while  e.g. is the abbreviation of the Latin phrase “exempli gratia” meaning “for example”.
  • Use e. when you want to give further explanation for something.
    Example: After work I’ll walk over to the Thunderdome, i.e., the new sports arena a few blocks away.
  • Use g. when you want to give a few examples but not a complete list.
    Example: I love drinking holiday-related beverages, e.g., hot chocolate, apple cider, pumpkin spice lattes.

How to Remember the Difference Between I.e. and E.g.

But by now, I’m sure you know that I’m not going to ask you to remember Latin. I’m going to give you a memory trick. So here’s how I remember the difference. Forget about i.e. standing for “that is” or whatever it really means in Latin. From now on, i.e., which starts with i, means “in other words,” and e.g., which starts with e, means “for example.” I = in other words. E= example.

A few listeners have also written in to say that they remember the difference between i.e. and e.g. by imagining that i.e. means “in essence,” and e.g. sounds like “egg sample,” and those are good memory tricks too.

So now that you have a few tricks for remembering what the abbreviations mean, let’s think about how to use them in a sentence.

E.g. means “for example,” so you use it to introduce an example: I like card games, e.g., bridge and crazy eights. Because I used e.g., you know that I have provided a list of examples of card games that I like. It’s not a finite list of all card games I like; it’s just a few examples.

On the other hand, i.e. means “in other words,” so you use it to introduce a further clarification: I like to play cards, i.e., bridge and crazy eights. Because I used i.e., which introduces a clarification, you know that these are the only card games that I enjoy.

Here are two more examples:

Squiggly loves watching old cartoons (e.g., DuckTales and Tugboat Mickey). The words following e.g. are examples, so you know that these are just some of the old cartoons that Squiggly enjoys.

Squiggly loves watching Donald Duck’s nephews (i.e., Huey, Dewey, and Louie). The words following i.e. provide clarification: they tell you the names of Donald Duck’s three nephews.

An important point is that if I’ve failed, and you’re still confused about when to use each abbreviation, you can always just write out the words “for example” or “in other words.” There’s no rule that says you have to use the abbreviations.

Dos and Don’ts

Don’t italicize i.e. and e.g.; even though they are abbreviations for Latin words, they’ve been used for so long that they’re considered a standard part of the English language. Also, remember that they are abbreviations, so there is always a period after each letter.

Also, I always put a comma after i.e. and e.g. I’ve noticed that my spell checker always freaks out and wants me to remove the comma, but five out of six style guides recommend the comma. Seriously. I got so engrossed in the question of whether a comma is required after i.e. and e.g. that I made a  table for the website summarizing the opinions of six different style guides.

EXPRESSION OF APPOLOGIZING

June 12, 2014 Leave a comment

We say sorry when we do something wrong, when we have upset someone, when we want to sympathize with someone, when we are about to disturb someone and even when someone else disturbs us! Have you ever stepped on someone’s foot and the other person says sorry before you? I suppose they feel sorry that their foot was in your way!

So what is the best way to apologize in English?

There are many different ways to say sorry in English depending on the situation, who you are apologizing to and how you are feeling. You may have already learnt this vocabulary in your English classes; however, I have listed 10 common expressions to say you’re sorry below:

Sorry.

This is a very common, simple apology and there are many situations we can use it in. For example:

  • When we bump into someone on the street (“Sorry!”)
  • When we want to get someone’s attention (e.g. to go past them on a train. “Sorry, excuse me”)
  • When we are sympathizing with someone (e.g. “I’m sorry to hear that”)
  • When we know we have done something wrong (e.g. “Sorry I’m late”)

This is a weak apology so don’t use it if you have done something very wrong – it won’t sound strong enough!

I’m so / very / extremely / terribly sorry.

This is similar to “sorry” but adding an extra word makes the meaning stronger. For example:

  • “I’m so sorry I didn’t come to your party yesterday.”
  • “I can’t believe I forgot the tickets. I’m terribly sorry!”

How careless of me!

This phrase is used when we criticize ourselves for making a mistake. For example: “I just broke a glass, how careless of me! I’ll buy you a new one.”

I shouldn’t have…

We use this when we realize that we have done something that we shouldn’t have done and now we regret it. For example: “I shouldn’t have shouted at you last night. I didn’t mean what I said.”

It’s all my fault.

We use this phrase when we want to take responsibility for something. For example: “It’s all my fault we missed the train. I should have woken up earlier.”

Please don’t be mad at me.

This is quite an informal phrase, which we use when we’ve done something wrong and we don’t want the other person to be angry with us. For example: “Please don’t be mad at me but I have to cancel our plans this weekend.”

I hope you can forgive me / Please forgive me.

We use this to ask forgiveness from someone when we do something to upset them. For example: “I acted awfully last night and I know I embarrassed you. I hope you can forgive me.”

I cannot say/express how sorry I am.

This is a very strong way of saying sorry. We use this when we know we have done something very wrong and we cannot find the right words to apologize. For example: “I cannot express how sorry I am for telling James your secret. I had no idea he would break up with you.”

I apologize for… / I’d like to apologize for…

This is a more formal way of saying sorry. You usually hear it in formal/business situations or emails. For example: “I apologize for the delay in replying to your email.”

Please accept my (sincere) apologies.

This is a very formal way of apologizing, especially when the word ‘sincere’ is included. It is usually used in formal letters. For example: “Please accept my sincere apologies for the mistake. We will refund the money to your account immediately.”

Being polite and knowing how to apologize are important in all languages and cultures. After all, everyone makes mistakes! Hopefully now you will know how to say sorry in any situation…

Source: http://bloomsburyinternational.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/how-to-apologise-in-english/ with small adaptation (words deletion and addition, and also style change)

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH LEARNING EXPERIENCE WITH FIREFOX ADD-ONS

July 1, 2013 Leave a comment

spell-checker add-ons

Mozilla Firefox is well known as a popular browser with thousands of add-ons that will make our internet surfing experience become secure, easy, and fun. We can find any add-ons: download managers, e-book readers, offline page readers, pop-up blockers, web inspectors, password managers, even translation and language learning tools! Here I will tell you some of language-related add-ons for Firefox that I have tried. But, since there are so many interesting add-ons in Mozilla’s database, I simply want to show you some of them. Read more…

A METHOD OF TEACHING FIRST ENGLISH WORDS TO YOUR KIDS

May 28, 2013 Leave a comment

अनुभव र अनुभूति (Experience and Perception)

Image

I took this idea from play dough then tweaked it a little bit to make it work for new readers. To make a flip book for your child, you ’ll need the following materials:

  • A small spiral notebook
  • Scissors
  • Two different colored markers

Turn the notebook so that the spiral binding is a t the top. Cut several pages of the notebook in half ( from the spiral to the bottom) . Use one of the markers to write one lowercase letter on ea ch right hand page. I used the letters t, b, p, m, d, f, c. Use a differently colored marker to write the following ending sounds: op, a t, ed, in, u g. Now, have your child turn one page at a time (either the right or left side will work) and sound out the word he creates.

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MAKE A CROSSWORD WITH CROSSWORDS

February 9, 2013 Leave a comment
Crosswords

Crossword Maker

CROSSWORDS. Just as its name, this application offers something related to crosswords. But it is not a crosswords game, it is a crosswords maker. Not only crosswords, it can create a word-search module too.

Read more…

WONDERSHARE: NOW YOU CAN CREATE YOUR OWN DIGITAL TEST

January 20, 2012 Leave a comment

Do you have a lot of questions you usually give to your students as a homework or worksheet at school? Are you tired and bored of wasting papers and ink to print the questions for your students? If so, you may try a software called “Wondershare Quiz Creator”. This proprietary application is so powerful to organize and share your “questions bank”.

Wondershare QuizCreator is a software developed by Wondershare Software Co., Ltd that focused on making, organizing, and sharing any kind of test such as true-false questions, multiple choices, multiple responses, fill in the blank, matching, sequence, word bank, click map, and short essay. Besides that, you can make a survey too, with categories: like scale, yes/no question, pick one/pick many, short answer, matching, ranking, which word, and essay. The interface is almost the same as Microsoft Office Suite’s interface, so it will make you comfort as working in Microsoft office environment. It so powerful to build a flash-based application and make you keep focus on the material, not the design. It’s also easy to use: type the questions in the question column, and type the answer(s) or the choice(s) in the answer column. You are free to decide the given point for each right answer, too. The supported output formats are flash application (need flash player version 9 or higher), Ms. Word, Ms. Excel, and pack into CD. Besides that, you can share your works by uploading them to Wondershare website or your own website / blog.

Wondershare QuizCreator can simplify your work in building test application than using other authoring software that might force you to master a particular programming language or lines of codes. You can type as many as questions you want and it will instantly show the result of the test (the score) in the end of test. To try Wondershare QuizCreator, you can download a 15 days trial from www.wondershare.com/pro/quizcreator.html. After the trial period has expired, you may decide to buy it later. To download the example of the test, you can visit www.englishteststore.com.