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Posts Tagged ‘English for Novice’

MADE OF vs. MADE FROM

February 1, 2014 Leave a comment

What will be in your mind if you get a fill-in-the-blank question like this: “The cupboard in the corner was … wood”? Will you fill the blank with made of or made from?

When I asked Google about the differences between made of and made from, Google showed me some references that mainly explained that made of should be used when the main material of a thing is still visible (in its natural form) and the material can be reversed, while made from should be used when the main material of a thing is no longer visible and cannot be reversed.

Made of

Example: The cupboard in the corner was made of wood.

On the example above, we can see that the wood as the material is still visible. And when we want to disassemble the cupboard back into pieces, we will get the wood (in a board form). So that why, we use made of because we still see the original/natural form of the material and can reverse it back.

Made from

Example: The paper was also made from a wood.

Actually, the paper was made from wood pulp, but it still from wood, right? So, the correctness of the example is still considerable, isn’t it?

Well, the paper was made from a wood. Why we use made from? Because we no longer see the wood as the material. It has already transformed into paper, and we cannot change the paper back into the wood. Made from is also used when some materials are used to make one thing.

WHAT IS AN APPOSITIVE?

January 3, 2014 Leave a comment

An appositive or apposition is a noun, a noun phrase, a noun clause, pronoun—often with modifiers—which sits next to another noun to rename, explain, identify, or describe it in another way. (The word appositive comes from the Latin for “to put near”). Appositives are usually offset with commas (put before an appositive phrase), brackets, or dashes. An appositive can be a noun, a noun phrase, or noun clause. Quite often, appositives are introduced with terms like namely, i.e., that is, and in other words.

Examples:

  1. My daughter, Sarah, likes to play Exotic Farm game.
  2. Do you know Zeus, the Greek chief god?
  3. My blog, https://myenglishcamp.wordpress.com/, has more than 70 posts so far.
  4. Amanda, my ex-girlfriend, contacted me again after more than 5 years we have lost contact each other.
  5. Indonesia Raya, the National Anthem of Indonesia, was sang very loudly by football supporters in GBK stadium on Indonesia vs. Thailand friendly match

The words/phrases in bold and italic are appositive. And since the appositive is “optional”, a sentence will remain “complete” even without it. For more explanation and examples, please visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appositive

THE RULES OF CAPITAL LETTER

December 17, 2013 Leave a comment

Unique FontsCapital letters are commonly known to be used in the first word of every sentence. But, besides that, capital letters are also used for the name of people, places, and many more. Here are the complete lists of the usage of capital letters.

Capitalize name of people (including his/her title)

Examples:

  1. Thomas Alfa Edison
  2. Mr. Bill Gates
  3. Professor Williams
  4. Dr. Joseph

Capitalize name of a country, name of areas (including streets, buildings), languages, political regions, specific geographical locations, organizations, and courses

Examples:

  1. Germany, French, Italy
  2. English, Chinese, Telugu
  3. Gothic Cathedral of Notre Dame, The Grand Opera House, Eiffel Tower
  4. Uluru National Park, Bogor Botanic Garden, Sahara Desert, Seine River, Java Island, Sunda Strait, Pacific Ocean, Mount Merapi
  5. First Avenue, Oak Street
  6. Southeast Asia, Middle East, Far East, Northern Territory
  7. United Nations, World Trade Organization, Red Cross, Python Programming Course,

Capitalize names of days, months, and holidays

Example:

  1. Sunday
  2. September
  3. Independence Day, Labor Day, New Year’s Day

AMERICAN Vs. BRITISH ENGLISH

November 19, 2013 Leave a comment

Generally, here in Indonesia, English learners are learning British English at school and I did it too. Besides British English, there are also American English and Australian English, which are rich of slang and non-formal expressions. But, whatever the English type we use, it still “English” itself. The differences are only showing us a set of different cultures. In daily use such as in speaking, British English is usually quite formal while American and Australian English is less formal. American English is also simpler in its writing form. Let’s check the comparison.

AMERICAN VS. BRITISH SPELLING DIFFERENCES AND COMMON WORDS

Ense vs. Ence

American

British

Defense

Defence

License

Licence

Practise

Practice

Er vs. Re

American

British

Center

Centre

Liter

Litre

Meter

Metre

Theater

Theatre

Or vs. Our

American

British

Color

Colour

Favorite

Favourite

Neighbor

Neighbour

Ed vs. T

American

British

Dreamed

Dreamt

Learned

Learnt

Burned

Burnt

K vs. Que

American

British

Bank

Banque

Check

Cheque

Checker

Chequer

Ize vs. Ise

American

British

Analyze

Analyse

Criticize

Criticise

Recognize

Recognise

Ll vs. L

American

British

Enrollment

Enrolment

Fulfill

Fulfil

Skillful

Skilful

Og vs. Ogue

American

British

Analog

Analogue

Catalog

Catalogue

Dialog

Dialogue

Common Words

American

British

Jewelry

Jewellery

Pajamas

Pyjamas

Plow

Plough

Program

Programme

Mom

Mum

Mustache

Moustache

Specialty

Speciality

Tire

Tyre

Whiskey

Whisky

Vacation

Holiday

Gas

Petrol

Parking lot

Car park

Subway

Underground

Highway / freeway

Motorway

Candy

Sweets

Chips

Crisps

French fries

Chips

Cookie

Biscuit

Take out

Takeaway

Soccer

Football

Football

American football

Elementary school

Primary school

High school

Secondary school

Recess

Break

Schedule

Timetable

Grade

Mark

Cell phone

Mobile phone

Elevator

Lift

Flashlight

Torch

Downtown

City centre

Trunk

Boot

Hood

Bonnet

Math

Maths

Restroom

Toilet

Drug store

Chemist

Zipper

Zip

Closet

Wardrobe

Line

Queue

Diaper

Nappy

Apartment

Flat

Liquor store

Off-licence

Store

Shop

Sales clerk

Shop assistant

Yard

Garden

Garbage / trash can

Rubbish

Fall

Autumn

Bathtub

Bath

Bill

Bank note

Call collect

Reverse the charges

Check

Bill

First floor

Ground floor

Movie

Film

One-way ticket

Single ticket

Round-trip ticket

Return ticket

Pants / slacks

Trousers

Period

Full stop

Principal

Head teacher

Purse

Handbag

Sidewalk

Pavement

Zip code

Postcode

Don’t be confused. We can use both of them without hesitation. There will be no difference when we speak them aloud.

CONFUSING ENGLISH WORDS

October 15, 2013 Comments off

Since English is only a secondary (or even tertiary) language here in Indonesia, we, the young English learners here are often confused about some “looked same” words. So that’s why, when we are listening to an English dialog, we may often get confused because of some words that spoken similarly to the other words. We call it as homophone. A pair of words that different in their spelling and meaning, but spoken in the same way.

Sometimes, we get confused too, when we are reading a text aloud then find a pair of words that almost the same in their written form, although the way to pronounce them are totally different. So, to make us more aware of the differences among the “almost the same” of English words, here I make a small list of them. If you are interested to develop the table below, please be glad to give any comment.

English

Bahasa Indonesia

See, Sea Melihat, Laut

  1. Don’t you see her? She is over there.
  2. The whales live in the sea.
Reply, Replay Membalas, Mengulang / Memainkan Kembali

  1. I will reply your text soon.
  2. Please replay the songs.
Not, Knot Tidak / Bukan, Knot

  1. The book is not mine.
  2. Knot is a unit of length used in navigation, exactly 1,852 meters.
Here, Hear Di sini / Ke sini, Mendengar

  1. Please come here.
  2. Please hear me.
Sum, Some Menjumlahkan, Beberapa

  1. Sum all the numbers in the left column!
  2. Some people are gathering in the park.
Tree, Three Pohon, Tiga

  1. There is one coconut tree in the garden.
  2. There are three coconut trees in the back yard.
Plan, Plant Rencana, Tanaman

  1. Do you have a plan for this weekend?
  2. I plan to plant some flowers in the yard.
Leaf, Leave Daun, Pergi / Meninggalkan

  1. The green leaf is a symbol of our community.
  2. We will leave at 5pm.
Rode, Road Menaiki (V2 dari kata Ride), Jalan

  1. They rode a bike for days to reach my village.
  2. There are many holes on the road, make it unsafe to ride fast.
Rise, Raise Naik, Menaikkan

  1. I like to rise at 6am or 7am.
  2. If you have a question, please raise your hand.
Price, Prize Harga, Hadiah

  1. The price is $1.
  2. The prize was only a set of stationery.
Right, Write Benar / Kanan, Menulis

  1. Please stand up in the right side of that yellow box!
  2. Write down your name, please!
Weather, Whether Cuaca, Apakah

  1. The weather is unpredictable, nowadays.
  2. I’m not sure, whether she’ll come or not.
Presents, Presence Hadiah / Menghadiahi, Kehadiran / Keberadaan

  1. She got a lot of presents in her birthday party.
  2. Her presence is absolutely important.
Sight, Site Pandangan / Pemandangan, Tempat / Situs

  1. It was a bad sight for me.
  2. The site was prepared to build a national monument.
Bear, Bare Beruang, Gundul

  1. The lonely bear lives in the deep of the jungle.
  2. The top of the hill is bare.
Advice, Advise Saran, Menyarankan

  1. She gave me an advice so that I learn harder.
  2. I advise you not to take it.

Once you come to know the spelling and meaning of these homophones you need to practice them for a better understanding. The more you use them, the easier it will become.

POSSESSIVE EXPRESSIONS

June 15, 2013 Leave a comment

After I posted some continuous posts about translation, I think that it is a good time to come back down to earth by posting a lighter article here.

As I could see in my blog stats, people landed here to look for “easy English” or “basic English” such as English for Junior High School or English for Senior High School, some expressions, and fun English activities. So now, I am going to post an article that must be suitable for both junior and senior high school students’ English learners: POSSESSIVE EXPRESSIONS. If you are waiting for or looking for such this article, then congratulation, you do find it right here. Read more…

A METHOD OF TEACHING FIRST ENGLISH WORDS TO YOUR KIDS

May 28, 2013 Leave a comment

अनुभव र अनुभूति (Experience and Perception)

Image

I took this idea from play dough then tweaked it a little bit to make it work for new readers. To make a flip book for your child, you ’ll need the following materials:

  • A small spiral notebook
  • Scissors
  • Two different colored markers

Turn the notebook so that the spiral binding is a t the top. Cut several pages of the notebook in half ( from the spiral to the bottom) . Use one of the markers to write one lowercase letter on ea ch right hand page. I used the letters t, b, p, m, d, f, c. Use a differently colored marker to write the following ending sounds: op, a t, ed, in, u g. Now, have your child turn one page at a time (either the right or left side will work) and sound out the word he creates.

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