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Posts Tagged ‘Daily Conversation’

ENGLISH QUOTES TO RE-MOTIVATE YOUR STUDENTS

September 27, 2015 3 comments

motivation

Do you always find your students lack of motivation in improving their English? If you do, then you might want to stop giving them harder homework. Or stop teaching them using vocabulary cards. Or stop asking them to memorize 5 new words every day. Or stop forcing them to take a remedial test every time they failed in the previous test. Or stop all of your conventional teaching methods. You want to give them a space to relax and start to talk to them heart-to-heart.

Maybe, you also need to re-motivate your students and remind them about the importance of English. Do not only say that English is an important international language, because some language experts say that English is not the #1 anymore, but there are Chinese, French, Germany, or even Russians!

If you have a plan to re-motivate your students, you can use the following popular quotes about learning languages that I took randomly from many websites. Of course, they are adjustable to be delivered in your English class. They might be a short quote. But they have very deep meaning. Enjoy! Read more…

THINGS YOUR ENGLISH BOOKS DON’T TELL YOU

March 23, 2015 Leave a comment

Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You

For about a month ago, I bought a very interesting book entitled “Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You” from Buku Kita. The book contains a lot of information that can be rarely found in the common English text books (and also in the classroom).

The contents of the book were actually a compilation of tweets by @englishtips4u. But, although the book was “developed” from tweets on Twitter, it doesn’t literally mean that the book only contains short sentences as on Twitter. So, would you like to read further about the book? Here we go: Read more…

LANGUAGE EXCHANGE, WHY NOT?

January 18, 2015 Leave a comment

my language exchange

How a language learning process will bring us into success is definitely depends on so many factors: our discipline, media that we use, supporting environment, and of course, practices. I have read so many articles and books related to “learning English”. Why people should use flashcard, why people should use audio podcasts, why people should read aloud along the reading practice, and so on. But, I recently found a site with a very good idea: language exchange!

We often hear about “practicing with native speaker” method. We go online, sign in for a “about language” chat, find new friends from other country, and so on. It’s really helpful. But usually (or sometimes), an ordinary practice with native speaker only give benefit for one side—the language learner. Of course, for the natives, it’s still worth to build a friendship while helping other people to learn their language. But I found a very interesting concept on http://mylanguageexchange.com/ where we can find one or more partners to assist us in learning a language, while we will teach them back our language in the case of they need to learn our language too.

Of course, language exchange method is not something new. But in http://mylanguageexchange.com/ I found a real concept of language exchange: I speak Indonesian and I want to learn English. You, an English (native) speaker, want to learn Indonesian. We build a friendship and we exchange language lesson. http://mylanguageexchange.com/ might be not the only site with this concept, but of course, we can use this site as one of mediums to gain higher level of learning a language.

http://mylanguageexchange.com/ offers free membership where you can use all features but you can only “say hi” to the people that you want to learn from. Or you can pay US$ 6/month to say hi and send e-mail in unlimited number. By “upgrading” your membership, you can start the conversation with anyone on the board, especially sending e-mail. For the pricing policy, please refer to this page: http://www.mylanguageexchange.com/FAQMembers.asp.

Through http://mylanguageexchange.com/ we can search and filter other members based on the age, gender, native language, language they want to learn or practice, origin, and even the conversation method they want to use (e-mail, text chat, voice chat, or live exchange in person).

ARE YOU (STILL) WASTING YOUR TIME WATCHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE MOVIES TO TRAIN YOUR FLUENCY?

July 25, 2014 2 comments

Good English

It’s a new year term here in Indonesia (actually, it was started on last Monday and this week they are having 2 weeks of holiday before they come back to their class on August 4th). So, every student is in their new class today and their “level” of English will be one level higher, yeah!!! 🙂

Well, by the way, how many methods have you applied to boost your / your student’s English skills? And, which method you enjoy most? Pardon? Watching English movies? That’s awesome! I love it too. And really, watching English movies to boost our English skills is pretty helpful. I often get new sentences for particular condition, new expressions to express feelings, and even bad languages! But really, watching English movies always give me new experience and I am sure it works on you too. Am I right? Read more…

EXPRESSION OF APPOLOGIZING

June 12, 2014 Leave a comment

We say sorry when we do something wrong, when we have upset someone, when we want to sympathize with someone, when we are about to disturb someone and even when someone else disturbs us! Have you ever stepped on someone’s foot and the other person says sorry before you? I suppose they feel sorry that their foot was in your way!

So what is the best way to apologize in English?

There are many different ways to say sorry in English depending on the situation, who you are apologizing to and how you are feeling. You may have already learnt this vocabulary in your English classes; however, I have listed 10 common expressions to say you’re sorry below:

Sorry.

This is a very common, simple apology and there are many situations we can use it in. For example:

  • When we bump into someone on the street (“Sorry!”)
  • When we want to get someone’s attention (e.g. to go past them on a train. “Sorry, excuse me”)
  • When we are sympathizing with someone (e.g. “I’m sorry to hear that”)
  • When we know we have done something wrong (e.g. “Sorry I’m late”)

This is a weak apology so don’t use it if you have done something very wrong – it won’t sound strong enough!

I’m so / very / extremely / terribly sorry.

This is similar to “sorry” but adding an extra word makes the meaning stronger. For example:

  • “I’m so sorry I didn’t come to your party yesterday.”
  • “I can’t believe I forgot the tickets. I’m terribly sorry!”

How careless of me!

This phrase is used when we criticize ourselves for making a mistake. For example: “I just broke a glass, how careless of me! I’ll buy you a new one.”

I shouldn’t have…

We use this when we realize that we have done something that we shouldn’t have done and now we regret it. For example: “I shouldn’t have shouted at you last night. I didn’t mean what I said.”

It’s all my fault.

We use this phrase when we want to take responsibility for something. For example: “It’s all my fault we missed the train. I should have woken up earlier.”

Please don’t be mad at me.

This is quite an informal phrase, which we use when we’ve done something wrong and we don’t want the other person to be angry with us. For example: “Please don’t be mad at me but I have to cancel our plans this weekend.”

I hope you can forgive me / Please forgive me.

We use this to ask forgiveness from someone when we do something to upset them. For example: “I acted awfully last night and I know I embarrassed you. I hope you can forgive me.”

I cannot say/express how sorry I am.

This is a very strong way of saying sorry. We use this when we know we have done something very wrong and we cannot find the right words to apologize. For example: “I cannot express how sorry I am for telling James your secret. I had no idea he would break up with you.”

I apologize for… / I’d like to apologize for…

This is a more formal way of saying sorry. You usually hear it in formal/business situations or emails. For example: “I apologize for the delay in replying to your email.”

Please accept my (sincere) apologies.

This is a very formal way of apologizing, especially when the word ‘sincere’ is included. It is usually used in formal letters. For example: “Please accept my sincere apologies for the mistake. We will refund the money to your account immediately.”

Being polite and knowing how to apologize are important in all languages and cultures. After all, everyone makes mistakes! Hopefully now you will know how to say sorry in any situation…

Source: http://bloomsburyinternational.wordpress.com/2013/10/18/how-to-apologise-in-english/ with small adaptation (words deletion and addition, and also style change)

MASTERING ENGLISH FASTER WITHOUT SPENDING MUCH MONEY

May 2, 2014 Leave a comment

Being able to mastering English is a kind of common dream of many people. Some people achieve mastery by attending an expensive English class or by flying to English-speaking countries to study English, while some people spend no cost at all to be fluent in English—both writing and speaking. If you have to choose, which method will you use?

Flying to an English-speaking country to study English is an expensive dream, although it’s a ‘powerful’ and ‘fast’ way to achieve your goal. But, how if you have no much money, want to be soon mastering English, and expect the same result as studying abroad? Read more…

WHAT IS AN APPOSITIVE?

January 3, 2014 Leave a comment

An appositive or apposition is a noun, a noun phrase, a noun clause, pronoun—often with modifiers—which sits next to another noun to rename, explain, identify, or describe it in another way. (The word appositive comes from the Latin for “to put near”). Appositives are usually offset with commas (put before an appositive phrase), brackets, or dashes. An appositive can be a noun, a noun phrase, or noun clause. Quite often, appositives are introduced with terms like namely, i.e., that is, and in other words.

Examples:

  1. My daughter, Sarah, likes to play Exotic Farm game.
  2. Do you know Zeus, the Greek chief god?
  3. My blog, https://myenglishcamp.wordpress.com/, has more than 70 posts so far.
  4. Amanda, my ex-girlfriend, contacted me again after more than 5 years we have lost contact each other.
  5. Indonesia Raya, the National Anthem of Indonesia, was sang very loudly by football supporters in GBK stadium on Indonesia vs. Thailand friendly match

The words/phrases in bold and italic are appositive. And since the appositive is “optional”, a sentence will remain “complete” even without it. For more explanation and examples, please visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appositive