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KUASAI 20 BAHASA POPULER DUNIA

March 9, 2016 4 comments

kuasai 20 bahasa populer dunia

After a very long time-consuming break, i finally could finish reading some excellent inspiring learning-languages books. And today, i’d like to share the excitement of reading one of those books to you 🙂

Well, the book i just finished to read was “Kuasai 20 Bahasa Populer Dunia” published by Panda Media. The content was mostly about “inroduction” to learn 20 foreign languages and was written to be suitable for most readers.

There are 10 “main” chapters and 1 “specific” chapter discussed in 226 pages. The first 10 chapters mostly talk about the benefits of learning new languages and the methods to learn foreign language, while the 1 specific chapter in the end of the book talks about 20 foreign languages you can start to learn.

The 20 foreign languages explained in this book are English, Chinese, Greek, Esperanto, Germany, Dutch, Russian, Malay, Persian, Turkish, Japanese, Italian, Arabic, Spanish, France, Hebrew, Hindi, Portuguese, Korean, and Romanian. Here in the last chapter, you can read about the history of a language, its relationship with another language, alphabet system, and also the culture of its origin country.

Why it’s important to learn foreign language?

This book explains that mastering one or more foreign languages bring a lot of proven benefits: stay healthy, access to new knowledge, carrier improvement, etc.

Read more about the benefits of learning foreign languages here.

What language(s) should I learn?

Learning a new language is always dilemmatic—especially out of school. I am learning Italian now, and there were many backgrounds that finally forced me to learn Italian than Japanese and Korean—yeah, I once wanted to learn Japanese. 🙂

And, to start learning new language(s) you will need a bunch of reasons/motivation: study abroad, travel around the globe, the similarity of target language with our own language or the ease of target language, etc. After you find your “most suitable” motivation, you need to start to find the perfect language for you to learn. And, this book will reveal what language(s) you should learn. Not only that, the easiest and the hardest languages to learn are also revealed.

What do I need to learn a new language?

Dictionary, comprehensive text book, vocabulary book, native speaker, course, and internet are only tools. Which one do you really need as your “ultimate weapon”? The book offers better and wiser method to accompany your first days of learning new language.

What else?

For me, it is a very light-to-read book that must be owned by whoever: students of high school, university students, teachers, and WHOEVER! Learning a language is fun and brings a lot of incredible benefits. And in the market, this book is one of good “starter packs” to know about secret of learning foreign languages that suitable for most readers.

WE ARE STILL HAVING FUN WITH FABLES

August 3, 2015 Leave a comment

And the audio-podcast project goes on….

Not so long after I posted some audio podcasts for listening exercise made by me and some friends, I got a lot of appreciations and supports from people around me. That was great, and personally, it was so “touching”. Moreover, Mr. Dewantoro Ratri, the author of “Menerjemahkan Dunia” decided to involve in my podcast-making project. He contributed his voice in the following mousedeer story. Thank you very much, Mr. Dewantoro 😀

Besides Mr. Dewantoro, I also got help from Mr. Khristianto from UMP (Universitas Muhammadiyah Purwokerto). He asked his students to involve in my project and some of his students’ “selected” voice can be enjoyed both in my previous and today’s post. Thank you very much Mr. Kris. I am waiting your own voice too 😀

I had asked some friends to join in this project too. And some of them promised to send the podcasts soon. I do hope that they will send me the podcasts so I can post and present them to you, my beloved readers 😀

Hall of Fame

There is no exact word to describe my gratitude to the following people. I just want to say thank you very very very much 😀

1. Mr. Dewantoro Ratri, the author of “Menerjemahkan Dunia” http://menerjemahkandunia.blogspot.com/
2. Saidah, Sandra Wibowo, Risma Rahmatika, Novetia Kristin, Dika Muniatami, Eko Pamuji, Mutiara Kusuma Dewi, and Agustina Tri W. The students of Universitas Muhammadiyah Purwokerto (UMP), under the supervision of my lecturer Mr. Khristianto http://ump.ac.id/

https://plus.google.com/+KhristiantoHakeem/posts

3. Friends who had promised to send their recorded voice in the near future

Again, without you all, this small project would never run at all.

Disclaimer

  1. The copyrighted image (cover) of “The Mousedeer, The Snake, and The Tiger” story was taken (digitally scanned) from the book authored by Mr. Dewantoro Ratri entitled “Menerjemahkan Dunia”.
  2. The copyrighted image (cover) of “The Vain Little Mouse” story was taken from here.
  3. The copyrighted image (cover) of “A boy and bear” story was taken from here and here.
  4. The copyrighted image (cover) of “The Fox and The Monkey” story was taken from here.
  5. The copyrighted image (cover) of “King of The Jungle and Little Mouse” story was taken from here and here.
  6. The copyrighted image (cover) of “The Greedy Dog” story was taken from here.

THINGS YOUR ENGLISH BOOKS DON’T TELL YOU

March 23, 2015 Leave a comment

Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You

For about a month ago, I bought a very interesting book entitled “Things Your English Books Don’t Tell You” from Buku Kita. The book contains a lot of information that can be rarely found in the common English text books (and also in the classroom).

The contents of the book were actually a compilation of tweets by @englishtips4u. But, although the book was “developed” from tweets on Twitter, it doesn’t literally mean that the book only contains short sentences as on Twitter. So, would you like to read further about the book? Here we go: Read more…

WHY YOU SHOULD LEARN AND IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH, AND HOW TO DO IT

February 9, 2015 Leave a comment

Good English

When I was looking for an idea to create a February blog post, I found my friend’s article entitled “Want a job abroad? Improve your language and communication skills!”. It was a very nice post. Although the orientation of the article was about improving language skills for computer programming projects, but I’m sure that it also works for other fields of jobs.

So there, my friend, Gabor, explained that to get better job, or even job abroad, we need to master at least English. Of course, other languages are also important, but in some places you can get by knowing only English. So, besides improving your working skills, if you would like to work in another country, you also need to improve your communication skills (at least) in English. Read more…

LANGUAGE EXCHANGE, WHY NOT?

January 18, 2015 Leave a comment

my language exchange

How a language learning process will bring us into success is definitely depends on so many factors: our discipline, media that we use, supporting environment, and of course, practices. I have read so many articles and books related to “learning English”. Why people should use flashcard, why people should use audio podcasts, why people should read aloud along the reading practice, and so on. But, I recently found a site with a very good idea: language exchange!

We often hear about “practicing with native speaker” method. We go online, sign in for a “about language” chat, find new friends from other country, and so on. It’s really helpful. But usually (or sometimes), an ordinary practice with native speaker only give benefit for one side—the language learner. Of course, for the natives, it’s still worth to build a friendship while helping other people to learn their language. But I found a very interesting concept on http://mylanguageexchange.com/ where we can find one or more partners to assist us in learning a language, while we will teach them back our language in the case of they need to learn our language too.

Of course, language exchange method is not something new. But in http://mylanguageexchange.com/ I found a real concept of language exchange: I speak Indonesian and I want to learn English. You, an English (native) speaker, want to learn Indonesian. We build a friendship and we exchange language lesson. http://mylanguageexchange.com/ might be not the only site with this concept, but of course, we can use this site as one of mediums to gain higher level of learning a language.

http://mylanguageexchange.com/ offers free membership where you can use all features but you can only “say hi” to the people that you want to learn from. Or you can pay US$ 6/month to say hi and send e-mail in unlimited number. By “upgrading” your membership, you can start the conversation with anyone on the board, especially sending e-mail. For the pricing policy, please refer to this page: http://www.mylanguageexchange.com/FAQMembers.asp.

Through http://mylanguageexchange.com/ we can search and filter other members based on the age, gender, native language, language they want to learn or practice, origin, and even the conversation method they want to use (e-mail, text chat, voice chat, or live exchange in person).

BLOG SURVEY

December 16, 2014 2 comments
Categories: Common Article Tags:

HOW TO USE “I.E.” AND “E.G.” CORRECTLY

October 9, 2014 Leave a comment

It sometimes hard (and also confusing) to decide whether to use i.e. or e.g. in writing, because they seems to be the same. But, through this article, I will reveal the “secret” about how to use i.e. and e.g. correctly and effectively. Most of the “original” sentences/theories can be found here: here and here.

What to know about i.e. and e.g.

  • e.is the abbreviation of the Latin phrase “id est” meaning “that is” while  e.g. is the abbreviation of the Latin phrase “exempli gratia” meaning “for example”.
  • Use e. when you want to give further explanation for something.
    Example: After work I’ll walk over to the Thunderdome, i.e., the new sports arena a few blocks away.
  • Use g. when you want to give a few examples but not a complete list.
    Example: I love drinking holiday-related beverages, e.g., hot chocolate, apple cider, pumpkin spice lattes.

How to Remember the Difference Between I.e. and E.g.

But by now, I’m sure you know that I’m not going to ask you to remember Latin. I’m going to give you a memory trick. So here’s how I remember the difference. Forget about i.e. standing for “that is” or whatever it really means in Latin. From now on, i.e., which starts with i, means “in other words,” and e.g., which starts with e, means “for example.” I = in other words. E= example.

A few listeners have also written in to say that they remember the difference between i.e. and e.g. by imagining that i.e. means “in essence,” and e.g. sounds like “egg sample,” and those are good memory tricks too.

So now that you have a few tricks for remembering what the abbreviations mean, let’s think about how to use them in a sentence.

E.g. means “for example,” so you use it to introduce an example: I like card games, e.g., bridge and crazy eights. Because I used e.g., you know that I have provided a list of examples of card games that I like. It’s not a finite list of all card games I like; it’s just a few examples.

On the other hand, i.e. means “in other words,” so you use it to introduce a further clarification: I like to play cards, i.e., bridge and crazy eights. Because I used i.e., which introduces a clarification, you know that these are the only card games that I enjoy.

Here are two more examples:

Squiggly loves watching old cartoons (e.g., DuckTales and Tugboat Mickey). The words following e.g. are examples, so you know that these are just some of the old cartoons that Squiggly enjoys.

Squiggly loves watching Donald Duck’s nephews (i.e., Huey, Dewey, and Louie). The words following i.e. provide clarification: they tell you the names of Donald Duck’s three nephews.

An important point is that if I’ve failed, and you’re still confused about when to use each abbreviation, you can always just write out the words “for example” or “in other words.” There’s no rule that says you have to use the abbreviations.

Dos and Don’ts

Don’t italicize i.e. and e.g.; even though they are abbreviations for Latin words, they’ve been used for so long that they’re considered a standard part of the English language. Also, remember that they are abbreviations, so there is always a period after each letter.

Also, I always put a comma after i.e. and e.g. I’ve noticed that my spell checker always freaks out and wants me to remove the comma, but five out of six style guides recommend the comma. Seriously. I got so engrossed in the question of whether a comma is required after i.e. and e.g. that I made a  table for the website summarizing the opinions of six different style guides.